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Federal Highway Administration Research and Technology
Coordinating, Developing, and Delivering Highway Transportation Innovations

 
REPORT
This report is an archived publication and may contain dated technical, contact, and link information
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Publication Number:  FHWA-HRT-14-091    Date:  September 2014
Publication Number: FHWA-HRT-14-091
Date: September 2014

 

The FHWA 2015 R&T Story

Research and Innovative Solutions for the Nation’s Highway Challenges

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FHWA-HRT-14-091 PDF Report Cover

A century ago, research and technology (R&T) played a primary role and led to the conversion of unpaved to paved roads with asphalt and concrete pavement materials, an innovation that led to greater and safer mobility on our Nation’s highways.

Portrait of Associate Administrator Trentacoste: FHWAThe value of research is seen in the development of large and small innovations in materials, designs, policies, operations, and safety on the highway system. Deployment of those innovations enables the highway system to move people and freight efficiently and contributes to the economic success of the United States (U.S.). Today, as in the past, researchers and inventors continue to develop innovations and solutions to transportation challenges.

The Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) plays a key role in leading the national transportation research needed to meet the challenges now and in the future. Collaborating with partners around the world, FHWA research conducted at its Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) is improving the roads and bridges we travel on every day, saving lives, reducing congestion, and advancing economic growth.

From connected vehicles and vehicle-to-infrastructure communications to road and bridge design, to policy decisions requiring quality transportation data, to human factors and environmentally sustainable roads, this is a time of boundless opportunity. What was once dreamed of as the highway of the future is becoming our reality today. And today we are moving toward solutions that will positively impact the transportation system of tomorrow. In the many innovations described here, learn how FHWA’s R&T initiatives are contributing to advancements in the transportation system.

Signiture Michael F. Trentacoste

Michael F. Trentacoste
Associate Administrator for Research, Development, and Technology


Table of Contents

Introduction

The Key Challenges

Conclusion

This figure shows how the construction of detour bridges at this location was impossible since these bridges were only a short distance (50 to 70 feet) from either end of the Elk Creek Tunnel in Oregon. With these severe limitations, the only viable alternative available was to remove and replace the bridges using hydraulic sliding system (HSS), an innovative rapid bridge replacement technique. (Image source: FHWA)
Construction of detour bridges at this location was impossible since these bridges were only a short distance (50 to 70 feet) from either end of the Elk Creek Tunnel in Oregon. With these severe limitations, the only viable alternative available was to remove and replace the bridges using hydraulic sliding system (HSS), an innovative rapid bridge replacement technique. (Image source: FHWA)

 

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